Tag: Reviews / Albums

Household Name

Household Name

The Brooklyn duo’s cheeky spin on Gen-X slacker rock asks: What does it take to become a 1990s alt-rock star right this minute?

The Spur

The Spur

Accompanied by a wide range of verdant textures, the Kentucky songwriter deepens the emotional landscape of her earthy, reflective folk music.

MUNA

MUNA

The Los Angeles trio steps fully into their role as pop stars and mentors, offering gentle instructions for falling in love, dusting yourself off, and joyfully living your truth.

Finally Enough Love

Finally Enough Love

The dance-pop icon selects her favorites remixes from a back catalog stuffed with club reworks, but her picks offer a curiously distorted look back at her history on the dancefloor.

High School

High School

The comedian-turned-musician’s concept album about his adolescence tunnels toward a series of deeper truths about how we end up as the adults we are.

Tilt

Tilt

Each Sunday, Pitchfork takes an in-depth look at a significant album from the past, and any record not in our archives is eligible. Today, we revisit Scott Walker’s 1995 turn to the avant-garde, a dense and operatic work of geopolitical and psychosexual pop music.

Not About to Die

Not About to Die

Decades after it surfaced as a bootleg, a collection of demos from the late 1970s reveals hidden threads running through a crucial moment in the UK post-punk legends’ evolution.

Sometimes, Forever

Sometimes, Forever

As the shadows deepen on Sophie Allison’s third album, she sees into the lie on the other side of success: You can win, but you still have to live with yourself.

Magic Sign

Magic Sign

The second solo album from the Real Estate frontman defaults to carefree songwriting that explores sacred moments of adolescence in the Jersey suburbs.

Home, before and after

Home, before and after

Regina Spektor’s first album in six years is weighty and ambitious, full of sweeping string arrangements and cosmic ruminations on love and loss.